Anthropology contra ethnography? 29 May 2019, 13-14:30, Rovaniemi

Sometimes in our field there are situations where we avoid calling ourselves anthropologists, for the sake of not being confused with those people who measure skulls. Instead we may say that we are ethnographers, especially in the post-Soviet Arctic. But is anthropology and ethnography the same? Many of us would say no. This is the topic of the next article that we are going to discuss in our next reading circle. Everybody is welcome! Also interested people from elsewhere, and you don’t have to be an anthropologist. All you need is to read the article and have an interest in the topic.

Place: Rovaniemi, 96100, Arctic Centre (Florian Stammler’s office, 2nd floor)
Date: 29 May 2019, 13-14:30
Article data: Ingold, Tim 2017. Anthropology contra ethnography. Hau Journal of Ethnographic Theory, vol 7, no 1. Open access at https://www.haujournal.org/index.php/hau/article/view/hau7.1.005

Looking forward to an inspiring discussion.

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Arctic Research: Co-production of Knowledge

The intensive Finnish-Russian PhD course “Arctic Research: Co-production of Knowledge” organised by the Arctic Centre (University of Lapland) will be taking place 20-24 April 2019, in Rovaniemi, Finland.

Attention to the issue of knowledge co-production in research, policymaking, services and public debates is growing, but what counts as co-production and what interaction between science and society should entail in practice remains often unclear. The Finnish-Russian intensive PhD course provides an opportunity to learn more about the forms and values of multiple, often conflicting concepts of knowledge and discuss options available for the integration of the ‘formal’ and ‘informal’ into the Arctic research. The school offers a platform for interdisciplinary exchange in different research fields: from environmental-, identities-, indigenous-, art and design- to tourism-, extractive industries-, virtual reality- and legal studies.

Acknowledgment: Course organisers wish to thank Finnish National Agency for Education EDUFI (grant number: 220000085711) for the financial support on this project.

Project coordination by Dr. Anna Stammler-Gossmann;
Project management by Dr. Nina Messtyb

See the Programme

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’Climate, fish and fisheries sector: Local and indigenous perspectives’

On April 16-17, 2019 at Arctic Centre, Rovaniemi, Finland, Anna Stammler-Gossmann organised a a workshop with the title above at the Arctic Centre, for which you can check the agenda (Ice_law_meeting_201904_agenda). The event was supported by the Leverhulme Trust (ICE LAW: Indeterminate and Changing Environments: Law, the Anthropocene, and the World, University of Durham, UK). As part of the event, they organised a public fish-cutting workshop called “Knowledge to Knowledge: Different techniques of knife sharpening and fish skinning, conducted by Eero Pajula and Ayonghe Akonwi Nebasifu”.

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Ayonghe Nebasifu and Eero Pajula sharing their way of fish-cutting. Photo: F. Stammler

One striking difference in the way they cut the fish (here: a rainbow trout), was the amount of fish that goes to rubbish when you focus on getting the filet pieces out separately (in the picture the right side with the rubbish in the plastic box). Nabasifu’s way focuses on the maximum use of all parts of the fish. Even the back fin is prepared for consumption: “if you fry it, it gets nice and crunchy, he said.”

This workshop was a nice example of how we co-produce and share knowledge through the joint experience of practice.  Thanks to Anna Stammler Gossmann for organising this.

 

 

 

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Does anthropology need to engage with well-being as a concept?

 

This is the topic of our next reading circle discussion, to which you are all welcome, 23 April 2019, 13-14.30.  We first meet in Florian’s office on the top floor or Arktikum, Rovaniemi, and if we are more people than fit there, we go to a bigger room. The reading for the discussion is Thin2009_Colby2009_well-being_anthro Thin, Neil 2009. Why anthropology can ill afford to ignore well-being. Chapter 1 in Pursuits of Happiness: Well-Being in Anthropological Perspective, ed by Gordon Mathews, Carolina Izquierdo. Oxford, New York: Berghahn books, pp. 23-44.

Cookies and tea will be served:)

You can also look this up at the ‘lectures and events, Rovaniemi’ page of this blog.

 

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Cambridge Arctic teaching position open

Our colleagues from the Scott Polar Research Institute search for an Arctic human geography teacher for supervising their undergraduate and masters students. The funding is fixed term for 30 months. If someone is interested in working for one of the world’s top universities – this is a rare chance in our field. See here the announcement: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/20663/  The application deadline is 16 April. If you are considering to apply and want to find out some preliminary information on SPRI or life in Cambridge, talk or write to Florian.

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Do animal livelihoods in the Arctic suffer from global warming?

This was one of the questions covered in an interdisciplinary exhibition on the effects of global warming and melting permafrost in Yakutia, on display in the Hokkaido museum of northern peoples. The exhibition with the title Thawing Earth – Global Warming in Central Yakutia is a nice example of co-production of knowledge between natural and social scientists and outreach experts, in a Japanese research project entitled “Arctic Challenge for Sustainability (ArCS)”. Organisers Atsushi Nakada from the Hokkaido Museum and Hiroki Takakura from the Centre for Northeast Asian Studies in Japan connected the available science evidence on climate change in Central Yakutia with practitioners’ knowledge on the effects. For a western visitor to the

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these bumps are one of the reasons of less grazing land available for hay-making

Continue reading

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Cambridge job offer, Russian Arctic Studies

Today we pass on the job advert of colleagues at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge. They search for a new person responsible for the world’s top Russian Arctic science library outside of Russia. The SPRI Russian library is really unique, I can tell from my own studies there. They have almost everything, and their catalogue also includes english abstracts of Russian books, which is extremely helpful. The library has a lot of ethnography and anthropology of the Russian Arctic. Anyone interested can apply, here the text of colleague Piers Vitebsky below:

“… the Russian section of the library might become a mammoth – huge and mighty, but stuck in permafrost and not evolving.  But I’m very happy to say that the institute is now advertising for a replacement Russian bibliographer.  The deadline is 24 March and the link to the advert is:
The position combines expertise in both Russian and bibliography.  I have asked and been told that a good scholarly knowledge of Russian (for example through experience of using library sources for one’s own research) is more essential than a formal qualification in librarianship.  Though this is not specified in the advert, it seems that knowledge of the Russian North, and/or of sourcing material from Russian publishers, would also be a clear advantage.
I have also been told that the university should be able to appoint the most suitable person regardless of nationality.  This opens the way to applications from continental Europe, North America and Russia too.  (Obviously, fluent English will also be essential.)
We all know that this is one of the world’s key positions for supporting research on Siberia and the Russian North, and will want to make sure that really good people apply.”
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