Happy new year Yamal style

First of all, happy new year to all our readers, followers, and a big thank you to all those who contribute to making this blog a success.

This is my first ever new years trip to the Russian Arctic. Flying from Finland to Yamal, one of the first visible impressions is the extensive use of light here in the Russian North beyond the Arctic Circle. Immediately after arrival friends take me proudly to the city-park in Salekhard. It’s a sea of light installations, with lit sculptures of Arctic animals, such as moose, polar fox, reindeer.

Immediately after meeting me at the airport, Lena and Ivan proudly presented me the decorated city park of Salekhard
Continue reading “Happy new year Yamal style”

PhD scholarship Canada community economic development

Colleagues from the University of Manitoba have shared this generous scholarship opportunity. If you are interested in economics of Communities in the Canadian North, and would like to get a funded position for a PhD on this, you should read on:

For Research on Community Economic Development in the Canadian North The John Loxley PhD. Scholarship – sponsored by Oceans North supports a PhD student in undertaking doctoral thesis research on Community Economic Development in the Canadian North. The scholarship provides $20,000, renewable on an annual basis, for up to four years and a total amount of $80,000, to a PhD student in the Economy and Society Stream of the Department of Economics at the University of Manitoba.

The holder of the scholarship will be expected to conduct thesis research on a topic or topics of importance to Arctic Economies/Nunavut/ Northern Canada. They will be expected to work closely with local institutions in these areas as well as with the staff of Oceans North, who will help shape the research proposal and monitor and assist progress. Preference will be given to Indigenous/Inuit candidates but all interested students are encouraged to apply.

Applicants must be able to meet the entrance requirements for the PhD program in Economics (Economics and Society Stream) at the University of Manitoba. Information on the PhD entry requirements are available here:

Please send enquiries to John Serieux (at) umanitoba.ca , Chair, Graduate Committee, Economics and Society, University of Manitoba with a copy to Betty McGregor (at) umanitoba.ca. Interested applicants should enquire by December 20th, 2021 for award and acceptance for the Fall 2022 term. Final determination will be made by the Economics and Society Graduate Committee during the admission process to the PhD program (applications to the PhD program for Fall 2022 are due by January 15th, 2022).

Who was John Loxley, after whom this scholarship is named?

As the leader of a group of progressive economists in the Department of Economics at the University of Manitoba (where he served for many years as Chair), Loxley helped to educate a generation of radical scholars and activists and was a leading scholar in the areas of community economic development, public–private partnerships and the IFIs. Here is more information about him

Job offer in Aberdeen: lecturer anthropology

Our colleague Tatiana Agrounova-Low shares a job-opening for a lecturer in anthropology at the department in Aberdeen. By the way, congratulations to her for becoming Head of Department in Aberdeen! Most of you know that the department in Aberdeen is one of the top addresses for Arctic Anthropology worldwide, since the time Tim Ingold and David Anderson advanced it to that level with their colleagues. The job offer does not specify the Arctic as a specific field. Rather they emphasize that competence in museum issues is of advantage. However, given the orientation of other staff there one would assume that Arctic specialisation is at least not excluded… The job duration is advertised as “substantive”, whatever that means in the job-seekers jargon. Here is the link to the ad.

A snapshot of contemporary indigenous life – with emphasis on Sámi perspectives

A new publication on Arctic Indigenous Peoples from The Sámi Council and German Arctic Office (at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) was just recently launched. While shortly browsing through it, I found that it is written very shortly and concisively and for a broad lay audience including decision makers. It is a publication written mostly by indigenous representatives (mostly Sámi) who are active politically in promoting Arctic indigenous rights. I particularly liked the illustrations.

“This collaborative project between the Sámi Council and the German Arctic Office depicts the ways of life Indigenous Peoples lead in the Arctic. As resilient cultures, Arctic Indigenous Peoples hold distinct knowledge on how to respectfully use the environment to co-exist within the ecosystems. Even though resilience is enclosed within these cultures, the challenge of coping with both environmental changes and domestic regulations affects the practice and development of Indigenous Knowledge. This text describes how Arctic Indigenous Peoples use Indigenous Knowledge as a generationally refined way of knowing to ensure the vivid development of cultures and livelihoods. It further illustrates how Indigenous Peoples have traditionally developed circular governance systems that sustainably care for the environment instead of dominating it. Indigenous Knowledge, as the foundation of these ways of life, is therefore central for Arctic Indigenous Peoples cultures and how they collectively preserve the stability of Arctic and sub-Arctic environments.”

From an anthropological point of view, it catches our eyes that the publication does not really have identifiable authors. It bears the name of the two organisations – the Saami Council and the German Arctic Office. Then there is an editorial team consisting mostly of interns. Not sure was the editorial team actually responsible for the content and wrote the text? Was it reviewed by someone? I found it slightly irritating that the sources they cite are actually not part of the pdf of the publication, but you need to click on their website on a separate link. Looking at the sources, it caught my eye that most of them is literature intended for a general or professional audience. Of over 40 sources, less than 10 were scholarly publications, including from the IPCC or the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. A lot of the sources are published by indigenous peoples organisations, the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council of ministers etc. So this piece is a good source for us to make sense of the view of indigenous peoples and decision makers.

Spirituality of abandoned Arctic Infrastructure

So-called ‘ghost towns’ attract people in a certain sense, the ailing beauty of their ruins and the atmosphere of silence that is so different from the silence that you experience when you are somewhere out on the tundra in the Arctic in a snow-desert. But when I recently walked with a friend through an abandoned building and felt the fascination of that atmosphere, I got also confronted with the opposite: for some people abandoned infrastructure feels threatening and scary for its association with death, decease and decline, and such people would stay away as much as they could from this kind of places. This reminded me of the relations between people and graveyards in the Arctic: that among some you are not supposed to go back to the graves of the relative after the funeral, or if so, then only in groups and on special occasions. Because the world of the spirits of the deceased is different from our world, and it may be dangerous for us is we engage with it in inappropriate ways. In my first field trip to the tundra, when I was going to take a photo of a Nenets graveyard in the tundra, the herder who was with me advised me: better don’t take a picture. “Not that I would mind, but we don’t know if this would be bad for yourself – who knows if the spirits like you taking this picture”.

So I wonder what is the spiritual implications of this ghost-town tourism in the Arctic? In many places people do not even take away the movable infrastructure of these places, although it certainly would have some value to sell. E.g. in the Komi ghost-town of Tsementozavodsk close to Vorkuta, there is a huge amount of trucks left behind, alongside the houses where nobody lived in the last decade.

Abandoned trucks in Tsementozavodsk, c Anadolu agency via Getty images

This place made it to the British Daily Mail newspaper with a detailed photo gallery of the abandoned infrastructure, and there is impressive air imagery from there by Reuters . Someone told me that it’s just more expensive to bring all this away from such remote places than the value that you get for it when you sell it. Hard to imagine. But I find a certain parallel to what I heard in 2013 in the village of Bykov Mys on the Laptev shore: there when the cemetery was being taken to the Sea by coastal erosion, the locals would not dare to go and recover some of the graves. One told me “if some Finns and Lithuanians whose ancestors are buried here would like to, they can come and exhume the remains – we are not going to do that. The Sea can take the cemeteries as all souls have left from there long ago”.

But in Tsementozavodsk this huge amount of abandoned trucks that actually look rather recent impressed me. How come that nobody took them at least to Vorkuta, which is just 17 km away. Surely they could be used there somehow? Maybe that has to do with the legal notion of escheated propertry (vymorochnoe imushestvo in Russian). According to the Russian Civil Code, the Russian Federation inherits such property if there are no legal heirs (article 1151, Law 146-FZ). But this may be only the superficial outside reason of why we see so much abandoned infrastructure in the Russian Arctic. It becomes part of the region’s environmental history. Speaking of which: this is a good occasion to congratulate our colleague Dmitry Arzyutov for his excellent PhD on environmental history in the Russian Arctic. It’s here open access. Congratulations!!!

Forest fires create hell on earth: Yakutia

related to the recent post about the forest fires in Siberia, here I share some footage from local people. This is not official news, it’s private people’s videos, often shot from their phones. It shows close up how Sakha people struggle to save their land and their homes from the inferno – mostly in vein. There is not much commentary in the videos, so people from any language background will find this shocking. (For those knowing Russian: please note this contains some dirty language):

20 minutes watching hell on earth. Words can’t tell the extent. But what is more: the fires leave behind the melted permafrost with all the terrible consequences. For us anthropologists first and foremost: where are local and indigenous people are going to graze their herds, and hunt for many years before these millions of hectares are going to be forests and pastures again – if ever? Some more pictures follow
Continue reading “Forest fires create hell on earth: Yakutia”

The North is innovative!

our university r&d department just shared an EU report, where Finland and Sweden lead their EU-internal rating for innovativeness.

Nice to see that the North leads the way there! We know that the Arctic is at the forefront when it comes to noticing the changing climate, and people in the North, particularly those who live in close contact with the environment round the year, have proved their impressive adaptability to these changing conditions. Good that this tendency also translates into a national level. If countries in the Arctic can lead innovations towards a better life on our planet, so should anthropology from and on the Arctic aim to lead the way for innovative research on social and cultural diversity and the ways how human social groups thrive in a changing environment!

Of course as anthropologists doing fieldwork with a focus on qualitative long-term participation in people’s life, we may be skeptical of the methods of these ratings and reports that base solely on statistical indicators such as numbers of university graduates, share of budgets invested in research, numbers of registered patents and designs, level of broadband internet penetration throughout the country, and the like. We are used to looking beyond these numbers and explain the deeper reasons for the ways in which societies and cultures innovate. Innovation is nothing new. Indigenous and local people in the Arctic have applied innovations as long as they lived in that environment, and continue to do so. We can explain the principles of such processes. Let’s live up to this expectation:)

Arctic climate amplification and Siberia’s burning forests

Usually Arctic amplification is referred to as the reason why the Arctic is warming faster than the earth’s average, as the Arctic’s surface gets darker (due to less sea ice and snow), and the surface absorbs more heat.
What we see currently in Siberia with the burning forests sheds yet another light on how this affects people’s life in the region concretely. Right now in Yakutsk, usually the world’s coldest big city, you can hardly breathe through the smog from the burning forests in Siberia.

In Yakutsk the afternoon sun hardly cuts through the smog, foto 16/07/2021

This seems to be having really bad health consequences for local people. Last night I couldn’t sleep because dry cough kicking in, and the usual option of ‘going out to get some fresh air’ doesn’t work: outside the air is still worse than in any room, as the entire region is full of smoke.
Friends told me last night that they hardly saw any sun for the last three weeks, even when there were no clouds. And in cloudy weather, some of the rain didn’t make it all the way to the ground through the thick smog. So I started reading the local news and was shocked: as of yesterday in the city the heavy particle concentration exceeded the legal maximum 8 times, and so did the nitrogen dioxide concentration. Therefore the authorities recommend not to go out, not do physical exercise, and wear masks with particle filters – good that people got used to wearing masks for the last 1.5 years anyway:( . But what on earth can all our friends do who live in the forests herding their reindeer, horses, cattle in the area? They don’t have houses where they can isolate themselves with air condition behind windows from this ‘fresh’ air. They’ve got to breathe it 24/7. And they will hardly wear masks in their nomadic tents…
One commentary to that news said that recently they measured exceeded limits by 36 times and he wondered how the air got so much cleaner that it’s now ‘only’ 8 times? They must have adjusted the legal limits to make it look less severe, he argues.

One could say ‘yes, forests and land is burning all over the place: last year Australia, every year US, so what’s special about Siberia’s burning land?
I am not an expert, and surely the colleagues from the Yakutsk permafrost institute could say more – but I think the difference to forests in non-Arctic forests is this: here the plants, forests, tundra grow on permafrost ground. Long-term fires heat up that ground even further than usual. Thus, the permafrost thaws even deeper, the active layer gets even bigger. This might amplify the unearthing of all kinds of ingredients, for better or worse: mammoth tusks, anthrax bacteria, methane, and all sorts of stuff. So the forest fires’ impact on the permafrost might be another dimension of the Arctic amplification, with consequences for the entire planet. Maybe the American and Australian forest fires were also pretty bad for the entire planet, but it seems in Siberia that impact on the permafrost is another addition.
Ironically, Yakutia is the world’s only place (as far as I know) where the authorities have passed a law on the protection of the permafrost (22.05.2018 2006-З № 1571-V) . As beautiful as it sounds – what does this help if the forest fires cannot be fought effectively locally? In the local news commentaries, the authorities have been criticized heavily for their disaster response

As of the 17 July noon there are still 134 fires burning in Yakutia. . I have been mostly in the city so far, and even there local people have to pay the local toll for this ecological disaster. Even more so people in villages and in the forest, who depend on the treasures of the land for their traditional livelihood.

arcticanthropology in top 30! Congratulations to our 10th anniversary!

Dear authors, followers, commenters, readers of our blog. Please allow me to share something on our own behalf: Just got surprising good news that our blog made it to the to rank 30 of the top 42 anthropology blogs worldwide! In their ranking I also noticed that we have been running this blog for 10 years now. Time for an anniversary-congratulation post:) Thank you everyone for keeping this active for a decade already! So that ranking place is a nice little anniversary present. The ranking is made by a company called feedspot, which screens the internet for content and alerts its readers. Apparently they found our content worth reading:). Our spot in their ranking is a nice recognition of the relevance of the Arctic for anthropology as well as the content that we post. We rank just after the blog of “teaching anthropology“, a journal of the RAI, and even some places before the Society for Visual Anthropology of the American Anthropological association. Very impressive! First ranked is Sapiens, a blog by the Wenner Gren Foundation, and second is the blog by Leiden Anthorpology in the Netherlands. In general I thought the ranking is slightly North-American-centric. As far as I understand, only around 10 blogs made it from Europe to their ranking. Congratulations to all of us for this success! That’s how the social media works apparently: the more we write, comment and are followed and read the more popular we become. When we started this blog in 2011, who would have thought that this will reach such a scale and duration!

Reindeer nomadism as profession, lifestyle, passion and love: Sergei Serotetto

русский текст ниже

One of the world’s most respected reindeer nomads, 1954-2021, mourning for a friend (all photos in this post © by Florian Stammler) Один из самых уважаемых оленводов , друг ушёл из жизни

The news from the tundra was a shock: last year we celebrated Sergei Serotetto’s 66th birthday together in his chum in the tundra of Yamal. Full of his typical humour and warmheartedness, surrounded by his family of three generations. Now he passed away, on the 27th May, in the tundra. Sergei Serotetto was one of the best-known reindeer herders in the Soviet Union, in post-Soviet Russia, as well as in the rest of the world probably.

Continue reading “Reindeer nomadism as profession, lifestyle, passion and love: Sergei Serotetto”