’Climate, fish and fisheries sector: Local and indigenous perspectives’

On April 16-17, 2019 at Arctic Centre, Rovaniemi, Finland, Anna Stammler-Gossmann organised a a workshop with the title above at the Arctic Centre, for which you can check the agenda (Ice_law_meeting_201904_agenda). The event was supported by the Leverhulme Trust (ICE LAW: Indeterminate and Changing Environments: Law, the Anthropocene, and the World, University of Durham, UK). As part of the event, they organised a public fish-cutting workshop called “Knowledge to Knowledge: Different techniques of knife sharpening and fish skinning, conducted by Eero Pajula and Ayonghe Akonwi Nebasifu”.

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Ayonghe Nebasifu and Eero Pajula sharing their way of fish-cutting. Photo: F. Stammler

One striking difference in the way they cut the fish (here: a rainbow trout), was the amount of fish that goes to rubbish when you focus on getting the filet pieces out separately (in the picture the right side with the rubbish in the plastic box). Nabasifu’s way focuses on the maximum use of all parts of the fish. Even the back fin is prepared for consumption: “if you fry it, it gets nice and crunchy, he said.”

This workshop was a nice example of how we co-produce and share knowledge through the joint experience of practice.  Thanks to Anna Stammler Gossmann for organising this.

 

 

 

“Linnaeus in Sápmi: Generating Knowledge in Transit”

The Anthropology Research Team is very happy to welcome you all at the Arctic Centre for a joint presentation by Professor Elena Isayev and Professor Staffan Müller-Wille, both from the University of Exeter, UK, on the 28th of May at 14:00 in the Thule seminar room.

Look at or download a poster of the talk on the “lectures and events, Rovaniemi” page.

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Drawing by Linnaeus, illustrating various episodes from his journal. From the manuscript ‘Oeconomia Lapponica,’ Linnean Society of London, Library and Archives, Linnaean manuscript collection, Call no. GB-110/LM/LP/TRV/1/4/1. Accessable online at http://linnean-online.org/157546/

Elena Isayev is Professor of Ancient History and Place and Staffan Müller-Wille is Associate professor at the Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology.

In the summer of 1732, the Swedish botanist and physician Carl Linnaeus journeyed through the Northern provinces of the Swedish Kingdom, including parts of Sápmi, known to him (and most English speakers today) as Lapland. His travel journal is often cited as the earliest account of Lapland by a naturalist and ethnographer. We are in the planning stages for a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award application that uses the journal to create a platform for public debate about issues ranging from sustainability and wellbeing to indigeneity and sovereignty. Linnaeus’s travel diary allows to explore how knowledge was created “in transit”, that is, in encounters among people, like Linnaeus himself, who were multi-lingual and moved between cultures: guides and servants, settlers, priests, merchants, reindeer herders. In order to bring out this aspect, we plan to create a new online translation of the journal while re-enacting his journey. Discussing the translation at gatherings with local experts and audiences – a form of collective learning while the journey unfolds – will be our vehicle for exposing the meshwork of interactions through which the North and its supposed healthiness have been, and continue to be, constructed.

 

Care, assimilation and revitalization in Deanuleahki, Sápmi

We have the pleasure to host at the anthropology team Annikki Herranen-Tabibi, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University.

She is doing research on  kin-based forms of care, and the ecological and political context thereof, in Deanoleahki, Sápmi, and going to talk about her anthropological fieldwork plan, as well as answering any possible questions someone might have about Harvard.

The talk will be at 23 November, 14:00 in Rovaniemi, Finland in the Arktikum house, in the meeting room “THULE”. Coffee and cookies will be served.

Researching along in the Arctic: from lecture rooms to research fieldwork sites. A workshop on research issues with Tim Ingold

On 23 March 2017, The Anthropology Research Team is happy to invite Professor Tim Ingold to participate as a guest discussant to a workshop that will be held at the Arctic Centre, in the Thule Room, from 12:30-14:00. The workshop shall give the possibility to all those who have attended Professor Ingold’s lectures at the University of Lapland, last week, and who are doing research in the Arctic and with Arctic related issues, to briefly introduce their current research topic (3 minutes) and pose some questions. Professor Ingold shall make some comments on the most relevant issues and we shall then turn it in a discussion on those issues that have most resonance with our current research questions. Contact: Nuccio Mazzullo

New Intern at Arctic Centre Rovaniemi

Léon Fuchs, from Versailles
Léon Fuchs, from Versailles

My name is Léon Fuchs and I will soon be 24 years old. I am a new intern at the Arctic Centre and I will stay in Rovaniemi until August 2015.

I will work with Dr. Anna Stammler Gosmann in the Anthropology Team. I come from France, but I have also lived two years in Sweden and a few months in Ireland.

I have a background in “Languages and Culture” (Strasbourg, France), and “Peace and Development Studies” (Växjö, Sweden). I am currently furthering my education with a second Master’s Degree in “Arctic Studies”, proposed by the University of Versailles, France. Continue reading “New Intern at Arctic Centre Rovaniemi”

”Shamanism, Symbolism and Culture”

Shamanism, Symbolism and Culture. Role and function of art in the transmission of shama_intrance_kulan_20120609culture and cultural practices”

The University of Lapland’s Arctic Centre, Rovaniemi, Finland, is pleased to announce confirmation of a 2 day International Shamanism Seminar which will be held on 27th – 28th of November 2014. The key speaker is Mihaly Hoppal from Hungary who is the President of the International Institute for Shamanistic Research.

A list of the speakers and titles of their presentations as well as registration details can be found on the seminar website.

On behalf of The Staff at Arctic Centre, we welcome you to Lapland – Best wishes – Francis Joy.

Extractive Industries, mobility and work in rural Russia

And another lecture on the extractive industries, this time looking at the sending regions of those people who work on the Russian Arctic’s oil and gas fields. What’s the importance of Arctic oil for a remote village in Russia’s south 1000s of miles away from the Arctic? The starting point is that we need to know about workers’ background if we want to understand how they succeed or fail to get settled in to Arctic settings.

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This lecture is also part of our course on resources in the University of Lapland’s “Arctic Studies Programme”

Oil, reindeer herders and flexible Laws on Kolguev

It is time for an anthropology team lecture again, this time focusing on Arctic Extractive Industries, in Rovaniemi, Finland, in the Arktikum building.

Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 1.27.40 AMWe do this in as part of our Uarctic Thematic Network “Arctic Extractive Industries” and welcome all interested people to join us in the discussion.