Tromso job offer: Associate Professor Anthropology

Many of our team have cooperated with anthropologists from Tromso in one way or the other. Now the department there advertises a job at the level of associate professor, with a job description that might appeal many of us:

“fieldwork-based methods; human-nature relations; environmental transformations and climate change; and the social reverberations of global inequality.” And

“Experience with the following would be an advantage (in no particular order of priority): audio-visual methods; human rights perspectives; and marginalized ethnic groups and Indigenous peoples.”

I have been in touch with Natalia Magnani and Jennifer Hayes there, and both are definitely nice and interesting colleagues to work with. Prospective applicants, give it a try!

Ysyakh 2020 – solstice festival online

Midsummer, solstice on the 21 June is for many northern peoples and cultures an important holiday. In Finland it’s called Juhannus and a state holiday. In Yakutia, where I am now, it’s called Ysyakh, and considered the Sakha people’s new year day. The 2020 celebrations obviously come in a very different format in comparison to any previous festivities, for a number of reasons including but not limited to the corona virus.

The president of Yakutia ‘Il Darkhan’ Aysen Nikolaev congratulating for the Ysyakh 2020 on regional TV. Note his Sakha festive clothes, the Sakha horse on his left, the sacred horse pole Serge behind him, and the few participants in the ritual with covid-19 masks
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Permafrost thaw responsible for Norilsk oil spill, impacting indigenous fishing?

Talking to a friend in Se Yakha, at the shore of the Ob Bay close to the Kara Sea, I realised how far the consequences of the recent Norilsk oil spill could go: the recent New York Times article about the oil spill cite environmentalists and even a Russian minister saying that the consequences of the spill could last for a decade. This is echoed by our friends from the Yamal Peninsula, who might be again among the most vulnerable victims.
The concern is that the spilled oil will eventually end up in the Kara Sea. And if that happens, it will contaminate the water along of the migration route of fish, on which the indigenous population along the shores rely for their subsistence and livelihood.

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