Sharing Polar Cultures and Knowledge: Perspectives from Libraries and Archives

Our colleagues from the library have alerted us to their colloquium, which is this year about the participation of knowledge-holders in the sharing and archiving practices that have transformed the role of libraries. Please see this announcement. The meeting is from 7-13 June 2020 in Quebec city. https://www.fourwav.es/view/1500/info/

All information professionals are invited to the Colloquy. Proposals on other subjects related to northern or polar information will also be considered.

Abstract:

Do librarians and archivists have a significant role in sharing Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern cultures? Do they still have a real impact in 2019 on the transmission of knowledge related to the polar world? How can the physical and virtual spaces of libraries and archive centres remain, in the era of information and communication technologies, essential places for sharing cultures and knowledge about the North and the Poles? The organizers invite you to submit papers on projects, services or thoughts related to these issues. Within the context of libraries and archives, the following sub-themes could be addressed:

  • Cultural exchanges and connections between Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern communities.
  • Transmission of Indigenous and non-Indigenous northern traditional knowledge and practices.
  • First Nations involvement in information management, preservation or dissemination.
  • Reconciliation and decolonization of libraries and archives.
  • Enhancement of heritage documents related to polar cultures and knowledge.
  • Popularization of major social and environmental issues and democratization of scientific knowledge related to northern or polar territories.
  • Establishing a culture of data preservation and sharing among northern or polar researchers.
  • Interdisciplinary and intersectoral management of research data on northern or polar territories.
  • Contributions from libraries or archive centres to foster the practice of interdisciplinarity in research on northern and polar territories.

 

 

Cambridge job offer, Russian Arctic Studies

Today we pass on the job advert of colleagues at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge. They search for a new person responsible for the world’s top Russian Arctic science library outside of Russia. The SPRI Russian library is really unique, I can tell from my own studies there. They have almost everything, and their catalogue also includes english abstracts of Russian books, which is extremely helpful. The library has a lot of ethnography and anthropology of the Russian Arctic. Anyone interested can apply, here the text of colleague Piers Vitebsky below:

“… the Russian section of the library might become a mammoth – huge and mighty, but stuck in permafrost and not evolving.  But I’m very happy to say that the institute is now advertising for a replacement Russian bibliographer.  The deadline is 24 March and the link to the advert is:
The position combines expertise in both Russian and bibliography.  I have asked and been told that a good scholarly knowledge of Russian (for example through experience of using library sources for one’s own research) is more essential than a formal qualification in librarianship.  Though this is not specified in the advert, it seems that knowledge of the Russian North, and/or of sourcing material from Russian publishers, would also be a clear advantage.
I have also been told that the university should be able to appoint the most suitable person regardless of nationality.  This opens the way to applications from continental Europe, North America and Russia too.  (Obviously, fluent English will also be essential.)
We all know that this is one of the world’s key positions for supporting research on Siberia and the Russian North, and will want to make sure that really good people apply.”