The Anthropology Research Team welcomes its new interns!

The Anthropology Research Team welcomes two more students who have joined us from the first week of July in order to do an internship at the Arctic Centre. They are Anne-Marie Lapointe from Laval University, Québec, Canada, and Trevelyan S. Wing from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, USA. At the moment they are both in Inari to get acquainted with the area and will be doing their separate fieldworks for their final dissertations. The length of their stay will vary and will include some 4-6 weeks in the field and some weeks back at the Arctic Centre for the writing up and for library facilities support. Anne-Marie has spent already one year at the University of Lapland studying at the Arctic Study Programme (ASP). Her topical interest is to look at the relations between Sámi people and tourism and in particular how these may have any influence on issues related to Sámi identity. On a different note is the topical interest of Trevelyan (Trevy). Trevy has been awarded a Stefansson Fellowship from Dartmouth to support him in both his internship and fieldwork. He is interested in issues related to climate change and on the possible effects and implications that these may have on reindeer herding as a whole. Their field experience and their writings will be supervised by Nuccio Mazzullo, who will be visiting them during their fieldwork and will support them back at the Arctic Centre.

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One Response to The Anthropology Research Team welcomes its new interns!

  1. Florian Stammler says:

    Great to have young students being guided through the first stages of fieldwork by somebody who is experienced in the field. Have success, and I hope to see internship reports here on the blog at some point. When back at the Arctic Centre, Anne-Marie could look at the literature coming out from the tourism department at Lapland University, and Trevy at the by now quite sizeable literature on Sami and climate change coming out of Norway and Finland. Good luck.
    Greetings from Kukisvumchorr (Sami for: the mountain along the long valley), another tourist region in the North West Russia where only the placenames still testify its Sami past.

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