Arctic Voices: Expectations, Narratives and the Realities of Living with Extractive industries: new publication

Arctic Voices: Expectations, Narratives and the Realities of Living with Extractive industries in the Far North (Edited by Emma Wilson and Florian Stammler ) is the name of a new special issue.
It has been ages ago that we ran a conference session “People and the Extractive Industries” and a doctoral course in Rovaniemi in December 2013 in our Uarctic Thematic Network with some very good presentations on local perceptions and impacts of extractive EXIS_coverimageindustrial development in the Arctic. Out of this we thought we could publish a good volume as a special issue in some journal. It was mostly thanks to my colleague Emma Wilson that this actually happened, and “only” two years after the initial conference and course took place, we now have a full special section of a dedicated extractive industries journal, volume 3 issue one of “The Extractive Industries and Society”. I think that’s not too bad a turnover time for an entire publication process from scratch to published, including numerous editorial tasks, reviews, improvements, corrections, and negotiations with the journal and the authors. We ended up bringing together a whole set of really interesting papers, including on Greenland, on Norwegian extractive industrial settings, on Arctic Russia, on the Canadian Arctic, so we sort of reached the aim of “circumpolarity” at least to some extent with this collection. All of the articles in one way or the other address the relation between large scale governance and local situations on those places where big industry meets local livelihoods. That’s why we called the publication “Arctic Voices“. Many of the articles are open access, so we hope and aim for a wide distribution of the collection. If you have problems accessing papers, please let me know. And of course comments and discussions on any of the topics raised are warmly welcome!

Extractive Industries, mobility and work in rural Russia

And another lecture on the extractive industries, this time looking at the sending regions of those people who work on the Russian Arctic’s oil and gas fields. What’s the importance of Arctic oil for a remote village in Russia’s south 1000s of miles away from the Arctic? The starting point is that we need to know about workers’ background if we want to understand how they succeed or fail to get settled in to Arctic settings.

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This lecture is also part of our course on resources in the University of Lapland’s “Arctic Studies Programme”

Arctic city-communities and the extractive industries: urbanisation, industrial livelihoods and sustainability-considerations

The extractive industries working group (EIWG) of the International Arctic Social Sciences Association (IASSA)

Gazprom Kindergarten in Novyi Urengoy, Yamal, Russia.
Gazprom Kindergarten in Novyi Urengoy, Yamal, Russia.

and the Uarctic Thematic Network on Arctic Extractive Industries start their  course in the Pan-Arctic PhD programme on Arctic Extractive industries next Monday until Friday. We have a very nice group of instructors and students alike, with participants from Canada, Norway, Austria, Finland, Russia, Denmark, UK if I remember correctly. A detailed programme and reading list can be found here on our PhD programme website.